David Segui Asserts Players are judged, not just the balls

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Former MLB Player argues that more than half of present teams are using steroids, and the ball is just component of the problem.

I think it was just a question of moment, right? Anyone who has even been halfway giving attention to the first quarter of this season has observed the meteoric increase in home runs this season in the middle of the MLB All-Star break, and it’s evident that something is distinct this year.

While there was a lot of ado about the baseball itself, David Segui presented the hypothesis to Bob Nightengale that the people were the people being improved, rather than the ball.

“I’d say 60 percent of today’s boys are doing stuff easily … it reminds me of our age when everybody talked about the balls being juiced. The sticks were not juiced, the competitors were juiced. Just like now” – David Segui to US TODAY SPORTS

Segui, a former outfielder and first baseman who worked for seven separate clubs from 1990 to 2004, confessed using HGH that he got with the New York Mets from a lounge attendant, although he disputed that he had a prescription to use it.

He produced news after his retirement by being included as a renowned steroid consumer in the notorious Mitchell Report.  His allegations are groundless, and he provided no proof to back them up. In a separate article, also with Nightengale, Segui produced the argument that steroids are handled differently from other athlete medicines.

“You can smoke weed, crack, or fire narcotics and we’ll safeguard that man and his right to privacy … “but God forbid you to bring something to cure or help your body and become a stronger athlete or player. They then depict you as getting an evil drug.

It’s the first thing. In reality, the expansive drug testing program of MLB prohibits the use of recreational drugs (or, as it is called, “medicines of abuse”) such as marijuana, cocaine, and others. It is the first thing. In fact, MLB’s expansive drug testing program prevents the use of recreational drugs (or, as it is called, “drugs of abuse”) such as marijuana, cocaine, and others.

Regarding the “evil substance” part of the comment, that’s kind of the consequence, isn’t it?  If I was an accountant and wanted to look like Barry Bonds after 2003, that’s not going to affect how my debits and credits line up, so I wouldn’t expect to carry too much heat on my dinner break to take “The Clear” in the bathroom.

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